Cholesterol

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cholesterol

Cholesterol is an essential structural component of mammalian cell membranes, where it is required to establish proper membrane permeability and fluidity. It is an important component for the manufacture of bile acids, steroid hormones, and Vitamin D.

François Poulletier de la Salle first identified cholesterol in solid form in gallstones, in 1769.

Since cholesterol is essential for all animal life, it is primarily synthesized from simpler substances within the body. However, high levels in blood circulation, depending on how it is transported within lipoproteins, are strongly associated with progression of atherosclerosis. Cholesterol is recycled. It is excreted by the liver via the bile into the digestive tract. Typically about 50% of the excreted cholesterol is reabsorbed by the small bowel back into the bloodstream.

In the liver, cholesterol is converted to bile, which is then stored in the gallbladder. Bile contains bile salts, which solubilize fats in the digestive tract and aid in the intestinal absorption of fat molecules as well as the fat-soluble vitamins, Vitamin A, Vitamin D, Vitamin E, and Vitamin K. Cholesterol is an important precursor molecule for the synthesis of Vitamin D and the steroid hormones, including the adrenal gland hormones cortisol and aldosterone as well as the sex hormones progesterone, estrogens, and testosterone, and their derivatives.

Some research indicates that cholesterol may act as an antioxidant.

Hypercholesterolemia, higher concentrations of LDL and lower concentrations of functional HDL—are strongly associated with cardiovascular disease because these promote atheroma development in arteries (atherosclerosis). LDL particles are often termed "bad cholesterol" because they have been linked to atheroma formation.

On the other hand, high concentrations of functional HDL, which can remove cholesterol from cells and atheroma, offer protection and are sometimes referred to as "good cholesterol".

(Extracts from The Cure for all Diseases)

Since bile is loaded with cholesterol and since over a quart of bile should exit the body each day, the excretion of bile is a major method of keeping cholesterol levels low. If the bile ducts are choked with debris so only half as much bile is produced and excreted, cholesterol levels will rise.

Since cholesterol is largely made in the liver, low cholesterol reflects a sick liver. Cholesterol is needed for every cell – it forms the outer coat or membrane. Old cholesterol must constantly be disposed of, and new cholesterol made. A healthy cholesterol level of “two hundred-plus-your-age” was established decades ago for Americans. It is not less true now, despite the current emphasis on cholesterol lowering. Cholesterol levels that are too high (over 300) will come down automatically as liver health is improved, as the thyroid level comes up, and as liver blockages are removed with cleanses.

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